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Breakfast Poem

The Homeschool Review Crew does word prompts for Instagram fun, I think it's great to have these words prompts for doing quick posts.  :)   I find them fun as sometimes it surprises me where my brain goes.  :)

The word for today is Breakfast.  Let's follow my thoughts along the way eh?



Breakfast

Day in
Day out
 Always the same 

Cereal

Honeycomb
Mini Wheats
Favourites of mine

Sugar Crisp
Kaptain Krunch
Favourites of dad

No meeting in the middle.

Along comes a boy child.

Middle ground.
Honeycomb yum!!
Kaptain Krunch is great!
Add in 
Fruit loops
Corn Pops
Alphabits and more.

Stretching
Growing
Not just Cereal
Push a boy child

Pancakes
Waffles
Bacon and eggs
Yogurt too.

Add in 
Fruit bowl
Toast and jam
Bagels sneak in
Cream cheese

Breakfast
Day in 
Day out
No longer always
the same.

___________________________
So what you do you say?
What do YOU have for breakfast?
Can you give me some new ideas?
 

Review: The Amazing Animal Adventure

The Amazing Animal Adventure is a large, hardcover book, filled with illustrations from all around the world.  A look and find book that teaches about different ecosystems.  Let me show you through this book eh?

This is such a neat book, one of the things I like about it is, it doesn't just talk about the typical ecosystems, it does mention the taiga and the rainforest and systems like that.

BUT it also ventures into the lesser known ecosystems like the Japanese Hot Springs, the mountains of the moon and hydrothermal vents.  I have NEVER seen an ecosystem book talk about hydrothermal vents so I was most impressed.

















21 different ecosystems, each with a two page spread.  Each system has a small write up about it and numerous items for the reader to locate.  Along with another challenge to complete.


It's simple enough for a child to complete, yet challenging enough to intrigue older people as well.  Some pages I really had to hunt to find the hidden items, and other pages were fairly simple.   It's all in how the eye looks and the brain processes what it is seeing.




As you can see, each two page spread is in full colour, with lots of details added.


The teaching block is written clearly, with good lettering and size.  Making it easy to read along with your children if desired.

I very much appreciated how each of the items you are search for has a picture beside it as well as a brief description with it.  Did you know that the burrowing owl uses old prairie dog burrows?
I found the add-on challenge a nice little touch, giving the reader an extra item (or three) to look for when they are done the main search.

This is a great resource to have on hand if you are studying ecosystems.  You can easily give to a student and, depending on age, ask them to find out more about any of the systems in the book and give you a report on it.

You could use it with younger students to simply introduce the huge variety in ecosystems that can be found on this great planet of ours. 

If you are concerned that you won't be able to find all the hidden items, there is a solution page at the end of the book as well as additional resources such as animal world records, endangered animals and how animals are classified. 

It's a wonderful book that we won't be letting go of quickly as it's fun to have around and gives me ideas for research subjects for the lad.  :)


Just as a sidenote: the book binding was superb.  It's very sturdy, my lad noticed the yarn showing through on the pages and said "neat!".  Not something often seen in a book now. 


The Amazing Animal Adventure: An Around-the-world Spotting Adventure
Illustrator: Brendan Kearny
Publisher: Laurence King
Pages:  64
Age Range: 6 and up
Size: 10.55 x 14.1

Reviewed for: Raincoast Books



 Amazon.ca: The Amazing Animal Adventure: An Around-the-World Spotting Expedition

Amazon.com: The Amazing Animal Adventure: An Around-the-World Spotting Expedition


The South Gate



Today we find Ezekiel being led to the south where he finds a gate.  Again, measurements are taken, steps are counted. and see what are one the jambs.
 
24 And he led me toward the south, and behold, there was a gate on the south. And he measured its jambs and its vestibule; they had the same size as the others. 25 Both it and its vestibule had windows all around, like the windows of the others. Its length was fifty cubits, and its breadth twenty-five cubits. 26 And there were seven steps leading up to it, and its vestibule was before them, and it had palm trees on its jambs, one on either side. 27 And there was a gate on the south of the inner court. And he measured from gate to gate toward the south, a hundred cubits.

The first thing that grabbed my attention when I saw this selection of verses was this.  Ezekiel was led.  In previous instances he was brought, like he had no choice, no ability to move on his own, like when you plunk a chess piece down on a new spot.   But here he was led, one who is led often has to move under their own power.  Granted, when being led, one doesn't always have the power to deviate from the path, and does need to go where they are being led to, but one is moving under their own power. 

It just makes it seem to me... that Ezekiel is being an active participant.  And you know what?   Active participants remember things better.   I know the Lord God will help Ezekiel remember what he must, but I suspect it will be easier to remember details when he's actually walking from one place to another.  Feeling those seven steps beneath his feet and seeing the palm trees on the jambs.  

Just like when we take part in something rather than just reading about it.  What you see and smell and hear and feel is remembered better if you are there to take part in it. 

Don't you?   What do you see in these passages on measuring and noting steps and jambs?   

You can read more in my Ezekiel Studies here and here.

This post may contain affiliate links - using affiliate links from A Net in Time helps fuel this blog and our homeschool - thank you! ©2006-2017 A Net In Time. All rights reserved. All text, photographs, artwork, and other content may not be reproduced or transmitted in any form without the written consent of the author. A Net In Time/

Embrace

Embrace

Emotions running.
I seek solace.
My father is gone.
We're singing his song.
My heart weeps.
And God meets me.
He holds me close and tells me
It will be fine.

I've been raised well.
A tall strong person.
A person well loved.
 
 The years pass
Since that moment in church
It's been two.
and I still recall 
clearly.
The spiritual embrace.
The love of a father 
for his daughter.
The love of a God 
for his very own child.

That love, felt and remembered
in the embrace of a husband.
in the quick squeeze of a lad.
My heart rejoices.
In the love shared.
--------

--------
This is a five minute Friday post. the word prompt is brought to us by Miss Kate.  Today the word is Embrace.   What is Five Minute Friday?  Well it's a party of a group of like minded folks who gather on Friday to do a five minute free write around a singular word.  AND THEN we take the time to offer up encouragement to each other on this writing journey.  It's fun, though it's not always easy, but it is always good.   Come join us won't you?  You are always welcome.

This post may contain affiliate links - using affiliate links from A Net in Time helps fuel this blog and our homeschool - thank you! ©2006-2017 A Net In Time. All rights reserved. All text, photographs, artwork, and other content may not be reproduced or transmitted in any form without the written consent of the author. A Net In Time/

Dad's Do

Since Hubby isn't working right now I am emboldened to ask my hubby if he can help out with specific things in the schooling of our son. You see, before his work took a lot out of him, kept him really busy and he helped when he could, but asking him to actively do something so that I wouldn't have to try to squeeze it in, just wasn't something I could do.   But right now, while he's between jobs, he does have the time AND the energy.   

So with some of that energy: Research

One of the fun things that we thoroughly enjoyed doing last year was studying one country every two to three weeks.   The lad's schedule is a bit busier this year so that study has fallen to the wayside.  The lad and I were talking the other day about how we miss that study and wondering how we can fit it in again.  We had a brain spark... could Dad help?

And so Dad helps.  :)   He has the list of the countries we finished, so in a couple of weeks we'll be eating a meal and learning the culture of another country and hopefully inviting someone to join in with us. (as that was always part of the fun having friends come and help us make it and learn with us). 


So with some of that energy: Guidance

Dad is also becoming more actively involved in "Can you help me with this math problem?" and in intervening when the lad wants to call it quits early or doesn't want to do anything.

So with some of that energy: Field Trip Support

Today he was an active participant at field trip to Boston Pizza today... with no push to hurry back so he could get to work again, no computer or writing tablet or needing to stop in to say hi to anyone along the way.  

I have to admit...it's a change I'm needing to adjust to.. but it's a GREAT change that I am learning to relish as long as it lasts.  :)

What does Dad do in your homeschool that you simply relish?

A number of other Homeschool Review Crew people are writing on the topic of Dad in Our Homeschool.  You can find a list of those posts HERE
http://schoolhousereviewcrew.com/wp-content/uploads/Dad-in-Our-Homeschool.jpg

This post may contain affiliate links - using affiliate links from A Net in Time helps fuel this blog and our homeschool - thank you! ©2006-2017 A Net In Time. All rights reserved. All text, photographs, artwork, and other content may not be reproduced or transmitted in any form without the written consent of the author. A Net In Time/

Parenting: Calling

Every three weeks or so I will be working through Parenting: 14 Gospel Principles. I hope you will join me. You can find the rest of the series here

This second chapter is entitled Calling. 

This chapter starts with this statement "Nothing is more important in your life than being one of God's tools to form a human soul."

I had to think about that a spell.  

That's what Christian parenting is all about.  Being used of God in the formation of a new human soul that follows after him.

In this chapter he spoke to the issues of parents not actually doing the job of parenting because their work gets in the way.   They sent their young off to school or to day care or to whatever because they are unwilling or perhaps not aware of the need to be around for their children.  This work can be a paying job or a ministry focus.

Gods' call to leaders is this "lead your family well". 

We are asked to look to our lives and see what calls us away from this duty to parent our children well. 

Our primary purpose is to instill God-consciousness and God-submission in our children.   To make them aware of who God is, and he has a calling for each of us.    Rules for us to live by.

I found this statement interesting 
"Children who don't acknowledge God will act as if they are God and will resist the help and rescue that God has provide for them through their parents."  (p 31)

I have seen this with my lad.  The more aware he becomes of God and who he is, the more he is willing to accede that maybe we, his parents, have something of value to add to the discussion.  Things to make him think and ponder upon.   It's part of our job you know?   To say "child of mine...this is God.   This God of ours is a God filled with grace and wonder and might".   To show him/her where you catch glimpses of God.

Most recently for us this has taken place with our study on Otters.   God gave them a little flap that goes over their nose, and another in their inner ear that automatically work when they go diving.  Not only that, he's given sea otters a patch of loose skin under their armpit so they can carry a useful rock when they going hunting.   Isn't that simply amazing how God did this for a critter?

 


Outer Court to North Gate

Today we are reading from Ezekiel 40:16-23. Last time about how God measures in complete numbers.  So partial information here:  East Gate to Outer Court. You can read more in my Ezekiel Studies here and here.


The Lord continues to show Ezekiel what the temple city would look like.   First he takes him through the outer court.

17 Then he brought me into the outer court. And behold, there were chambers and a pavement, all around the court. Thirty chambers faced the pavement. 18 And the pavement ran along the side of the gates, corresponding to the length of the gates. This was the lower pavement. 19 Then he measured the distance from the inner front of the lower gate to the outer front of the inner court, a hundred cubits on the east side and on the north side.

And then through the North Gate.

20 As for the gate that faced toward the north, belonging to the outer court, he measured its length and its breadth. 21 Its side rooms, three on either side, and its jambs and its vestibule were of the same size as those of the first gate. Its length was fifty cubits, and its breadth twenty-five cubits. 22 And its windows, its vestibule, and its palm trees were of the same size as those of the gate that faced toward the east. And by seven steps people would go up to it, and find its vestibule before them. 23 And opposite the gate on the north, as on the east, was a gate to the inner court. And he measured from gate to gate, a hundred cubits.

I have to wonder...what is the point of all this measuring?   The temple had been built already.  Why is seeing this so important?  

I'm getting curious...  

Do you have insight reader?   What do you think is the point of seeing the building and knowing all the measurements of it.    


This post may contain affiliate links - using affiliate links from A Net in Time helps fuel this blog and our homeschool - thank you! ©2006-2017 A Net In Time. All rights reserved. All text, photographs, artwork, and other content may not be reproduced or transmitted in any form without the written consent of the author. A Net In Time/

Progression in an Art Project

So I finished my art project a while back but haven't done up a post to tell you about it.   Today is that day as I sit huddled in a cuddle blanket because baby it's cold outside.  :)

I started this project with the high hopes that my lad would join in and make one of his own, but the method and the medium where just too different for him to wrap his head around, so I made it sitting next to him as he worked on his own project.  This gave me the opportunity to say.. so this is what I am doing now.. what do you think?   Or do you think if I do this it might work?   This proved to be a really really good thing to do.  He gave me some great ideas as well.  :)

I started off drawing a generalized picture of some mountains.  My son had started a pencil sketch of the mountains at the same time. 

I then started to layer some tissue paper over my drawing, folding it in to create mountain peaks, layering over top of each to hopefully create depth and shading.  All my tissue paper came from gifts or wrap that some stores use when you buy clothes from them.   The brown paper came from a book review.  Each layer was modge-podged well together and left to dry between episodes.
As you can see the mountains gradually came together.   I even showed my lad a quick way to add a touch of colour and he was quite surprised at how easy it was. 
Since this was a work in transition I wasn't quite sure what I really wanted to do with it.  I knew I wanted some texture and colour and to make something unique to peak the interest of my lad, so when the mountains where done I added some green trees (just triangles of tissue).  Then I got the brainstorm of adding some clouds that were fluffy.   Oh my...You should have seen the surprise on my boys face!!   Then he said "MOM!   That works!   Can I do one too?"

We talked about whether we should leave them white or experiment with how we could turn them into black rain clouds, but the risk was we'd wreck them so the risk was rejected.
 
The trunk caused a bit an issue for me.

I wanted to find a way to add some texture as my thought was to have the trunk pop out a bit... like seeing a tree in the foreground and having the background fade away behind it.

I tried laying tissue paper.. looked horrible and I thought "OH NO!!   It's been ruined!!!"  But then I got to thinking I could cover up the horribleness with twisted strands of tissue paper.   And it worked!   

You should have heard the lad.... "Mom.. I really like that.  You did a better job doing that then the other paper. "

He helped me cut the limbs for the top of the tree.  He volunteered to help me out with this.   Having the limbs hang out over the edge of the paper was his genius at work.
 

 The canoe.. oh my....

This was HARD to do.   We tried a number of things to make a realistic canoe and nothing really worked.  I finally looked for a canoe picture and VERY carefully cut it out, then traced out a canoe bottom and glued that together.

Then I added a piece of foam to the bottom to make it stand out from the bottom.   The lad chose the location and then we were done. 

Dad pronounced it well done and the lad WILL NOT let me remove it.  It stays on display in the bookroom and it makes me smile.  :)




This abstractly, see how it does art, was just so much fun to do and made for much conversation twixt the lad and myself.  I LOVE IT!!!  (the smiles it brings to me as I think back over it).
 
So what fly by the seat of your pants art have you made lately?  

Going to link this up at Kym's and Charleen's Art Post thing they have going on.   


This post may contain affiliate links - using affiliate links from A Net in Time helps fuel this blog and our homeschool - thank you! ©2006-2017 A Net In Time. All rights reserved. All text, photographs, artwork, and other content may not be reproduced or transmitted in any form without the written consent of the author. A Net In Time/

Art Series: Sister Wendy's Story of Painting

It is my total delight to introduce DoodleMom to you, also known as Kirsten to the blog today. I put a call out for people to do an art book post for the blog and Kirsten stepped up to the challenge. :)


Kirsten blogs at  DoodleMom's Homeschooling Life and is a new to me blogger this year.  Let me tell you...she is a gal who makes me think and ponder in a way I sometimes don't expect and that is a good thing eh?  :)  Keeps me from being stagnant and who wants that eh?

 Sister Wendy's Story of Painting

I did not notice until recently that a very proper and very, very smart nun with a history of teaching English and Art was also a master of polite sarcasm. 

My kids and I were watching Sister Wendy’s Story of Painting (available free on Docuwatch) and reading another chapter in her book of the same name. Art history with Sister Wendy reinforces and makes additional connections to the events and people of the history the kids are learning, as well as helping them to understand composition and technique. And Sister Wendy is also teaching my kids the fine art of polite sarcasm. 

My children sat on either side of me, magnifying glasses in hand so they could investigate each tiny detail of the paintings discussed in the text. We were looking over Sister Wendy’s comparison of illuminations from England, France, Ireland, and Spain, all from the same rough time period. And we came to this statement, “Like the Irish monks, the British also produced manuscripts of great beauty, this being one of the very few periods in which the least visual of national groups, the English speakers, attained international fame as artists.” “Hmmm,” I thought to myself. As we continued, my children began to pick up on the sarcasm as well. 

We got to the section discussing the Bayeux Tapestry and Sister Wendy wrote, “It displays the same jerky animation that we find in English manuscripts. A sort of Anglo-Saxon glorified comic strip…” Finally we read through the section on French illumination in which Sister Wendy wrote, “A lovely missal survives…,” and “…with a magnificent pictorial “O” and…” “OK,” said my son. “She definitely likes the French best and the English least.”  While her sarcasm stings and is quite apparent, it is also exceedingly polite. A grand way to show her preferences and dislikes. 

And, once my children recognized her sarcasm, the whole activity of studying art became an interactive one. First understanding Sister Wendy’s preferences, the reasons behind them, enjoying her wit, and finally forming their own opinions on the art or artist in question. All in all, a perfect way to study art.

Where to Find More

Book:
Amazon.ca: Sister Wendy's Story of Painting

Amazon.com: Sister Wendy's Story of Painting


Documentary: Sister Wendy`s Story of Painting (6 episodes)

 

 

About Kirsten

Kirsten West is a Christian Homeschooling Mom who blogs at DoodleMom's Homeschooling Life

This post may contain affiliate links - using affiliate links from A Net in Time helps fuel this blog and our homeschool - thank you! ©2006-2017 A Net In Time. All rights reserved. All text, photographs, artwork, and other content may not be reproduced or transmitted in any form without the written consent of the author. A Net In Time/

The East Gate to the Outer Court

Today we are reading from Ezekiel 40:1-4. Last time we met we learned about how we should respond to a word or vision from the Lord God:  Look, hear and Set Your Heart. You can read more in my Ezekiel Studies here and here.


Ezekiel is given a vision from the Lord God:    The bronze man with the measuring stick had work to do measuring in the city like structure that Ezekiel saw.  

And behold, there was a wall all around the outside of the temple area, and the length of the measuring reed in the man's hand was six long cubits, each being a cubit and a handbreadth in length. So he measured the thickness of the wall, one reed; and the height, one reed. Then he went into the gateway facing east, going up its steps, and measured the threshold of the gate, one reed deep. And the side rooms, one reed long and one reed broad; and the space between the side rooms, five cubits; and the threshold of the gate by the vestibule of the gate at the inner end, one reed. Then he measured the vestibule of the gateway, on the inside, one reed. Then he measured the vestibule of the gateway, eight cubits; and its jambs, two cubits; and the vestibule of the gate was at the inner end. 10 And there were three side rooms on either side of the east gate. The three were of the same size, and the jambs on either side were of the same size. 11 Then he measured the width of the opening of the gateway, ten cubits; and the length of the gateway, thirteen cubits. 12 There was a barrier before the side rooms, one cubit on either side. And the side rooms were six cubits on either side. 13 Then he measured the gate from the ceiling of the one side room to the ceiling of the other, a breadth of twenty-five cubits; the openings faced each other. 14 He measured also the vestibule, sixty cubits. And around the vestibule of the gateway was the court. 15 From the front of the gate at the entrance to the front of the inner vestibule of the gate was fifty cubits. 16 And the gateway had windows all around, narrowing inwards toward the side rooms and toward their jambs, and likewise the vestibule had windows all around inside, and on the jambs were palm trees.
 
All these exact measurements taken, everything just so exact.  Did you notice there were no half-measures?  Each measure was full.  Complete.  A complete Integer (sorry, math is on my brain since a math program my son is using, is using the term integer incorrectly). 

But nothing is lacking here.  Everything is just as it should be.  

All this exactness.  Makes me wonder what Ezekiel thought as he saw this. Was he desperately trying to remember the numbers?  The room locations?  Where the windows where?    How was he taking in this vision so he could adequately convey to the Israelites?

How do I take in God's word?  Ezekiel was told to Look, Hear and Set Himself in regards to what he would see and then later tell to the people.  Was he just seeing the rooms and the act of measuring?   Did he see that measuring as a sign of God's action toward the people?

It's hard to know at this point eh?

That's all I see in this reading so far.  I am wondering what Ezekiel will see in the next section.   More temple/city like structure area and more measurements or something else? 
  
This post may contain affiliate links - using affiliate links from A Net in Time helps fuel this blog and our homeschool - thank you! ©2006-2017 A Net In Time. All rights reserved. All text, photographs, artwork, and other content may not be reproduced or transmitted in any form without the written consent of the author. A Net In Time/

Recipe: Tuna Cakes

I brought home this huge bag of tuna from the foodbank (they have reams and reams of it and are having a hard time getting rid of it).   So I thought today I'd make up some tuna dishes, so to eat now, some to eat later. 

First up: Tuna Cakes.  Hubby requested I make these.  I made a small one to tempt my son and to my complete shock the rest of the tuna cakes disappeared almost instantly. :)   His enthusiastic "you can make these again" warmed my heart.  :)

 I used this recipe


Ingredients


  • 2 eggs
  • 2 teaspoons lemon juice
  • 3 tablespoons grated Parmesan cheese
  • 10 tablespoons Italian-seasoned bread crumbs
  • 3 (5 ounce) cans tuna, drained
  • 3 tablespoons diced onion
  • 1 pinch ground black pepper
  • 3 tablespoons vegetable oil 

   

Directions

  1. Beat eggs and lemon juice in a bowl; stir in Parmesan cheese and bread crumbs to make a paste. Fold in tuna and onion until well-mixed. Season with black pepper. Shape tuna mixture into eight 1-inch-thick patties.
  2. Heat vegetable oil in a skillet over medium heat; fry patties until golden brown, about 5 minutes per side.
Notes:
I'm reading this recipe over and realized I forgot one ingredient: The bread crumbs.   But it turned out so well it surprises me.  :)   Next time I'll put in the bread crumbs  :) 

My thoughts: YUM!!
Hubby's Thoughts: These are good
Son's thoughts: A request I make them again.

Look, Hear, Set your Heart

Today we are reading from Ezekiel 40:1-4. Last time we met we learned about how He will Pout out his Spirit. You can read more in my Ezekiel Studies here and here.

Once again the hand of the Lord comes upon Ezekiel.   He was brought to the city where he saw visions, in those vision he was on a very high mountain and and he saw a structure
like a city down to the south.

He saw a man like bronze with a linen cord and a measuring rod in his hand standing in the gateway.

 And the man said to me, “Son of man, look with your eyes, and hear with your ears, and set your heart upon all that I shall show you, for you were brought here in order that I might show it to you. Declare all that you see to the house of Israel.”

This vision is going to be something Ezekiel has to tell the Israelites!   He needs to see this thing.  ACK!!!   I can hardly wait!   I find myself sitting here eagerly anticipating what this man in bronze is going to show Ezekiel.

As I realize that I wonder... do I go to church like that?   Do I regularly approach God's word with the eagerness.   Right now I am listening to a fascinating book called Ariel and I am just enjoying this book and want to hear what happens next.  I compare those two feelings...this one of wanting to know what the man in bronze has to say and What will happen with the dragonriders in Ariel.

And you know what... right now it's the same.  I want to know... but I know if life gets busy I can put off that anticipation.

J starts with Jump Canada and carries on..

Welcome to week J of Blogging through the Alphabet.  I am so pleased you have joined Amanda and I in this venture.  :)



I wasn't sure what to do with the Letter J.  

Attack Canada!! War Plan Red, A review

 Hey... did you know that the United States had a secret plan to invade Canada!?!?!?!   DASTARDLY BEASTS!!!!   I tell yah!  :)   (don't take me too seriously eh?)  You can learn all about it in War Plan Red.

But oh no!!!!   Canada had secret plans to invade the United States as well!!!   ... but really... we're not dastardly beasts.. really.  :)  LOL

Anyways, this book is a fascinating glimpse into the history between what is called "the friendliest border".   We weren't always so friendly, from the war of 1812, to the threatened trade of Canada as reparation by Great Britain for how they played both sides in the American Civil War, to the War of the Pig.  I know.. a war over a pig?!?!?!

I laughed.
I shook my head.
And the history I learned... oh my!  :)

The things they don't teach you in school.  

Like did you know that part of buying Alaska...was not only protection from Russia...but as a first step to buying British Columbia...and then slowly buying the rest of Canada?   Could you image that the entirety of the North American continent being one huge country?     Or how about trading Canada for Ireland or even have Canada AS an Irish Republic to launch attacks at Great Britain?  This was a scheme by the Fenians (catholic Irishmen).   It failed if only because most Irish in Canada were Protestant and the two simply didn't cooperate with each other.

Canadian Pride was well-establish since the start of my beloved land.   We started off declaring  "We are a northern people...more manly, more real, then the weak-marrowed bones and superstitions of the effeminate south".  (p.57)  Our success at Vimy Ridge solidified our national pride.  To this day, part of being Canadian is to tease our neighbour to the south.

So why build a plan to attack Canada?   As a means to attack Great Britain.   The awareness was that to attack Great Britain you would first need to take out their northern neighbour.

Included in the last 1/3 of the book is a reproduction of the American plan of attack.  The War Plan Red.

How we went from that to having such a friendly border... I don't know... but we've managed it.  :)  



Should you read it?
Yes!  If you are interested in the history of the border between Canada and the United States.  I found it fascinating... but I'm a Canadian.  I intend to hold on to it until my lad is old enough to read it for himself.  I suspect he'll find it interesting as a teenager.    It is a book written for young adults and up.

 

War Plan Red
Author: Kevin Lippert
Publisher: Princeton Architectural Press
Pages: 128

Reviewed for: Raincoast Books




 Amazon.ca: War Plan Red: The United States' Secret Plan to Invade Canada and Canada's Secret Plan to Invade the United States

Amazon.com: War Plan Red: The United States' Secret Plan to Invade Canada and Canada's Secret Plan to Invade the United States


This post may contain affiliate links - using affiliate links from A Net in Time helps fuel this blog and our homeschool - thank you! ©2006-2017 A Net In Time. All rights reserved. All text, photographs, artwork, and other content may not be reproduced or transmitted in any form without the written consent of the author. A Net In Time/

He Will Pour Out His Spirit

Today we are reading from Ezekiel 39:25-29. Last time we met we learned about God's Holiness made Manifest. You can read more in my Ezekiel Studies here and here.

We saw how the Lord's holiness was made apparent to all...from Israel to the nations surrounding her. 


Now we find God making a promise to his people.   He will 
  • restore the fortunes of Jacob and have mercy on the whole house of Israel
  • I will be jealous for my holy name. 
The end result of that should be this: 
 26 They shall forget their shame and all the treachery they have practiced against me, 

Hymn Study: Praise the Lord: Ye Heavens Adore Him

Praise The Lord: Ye Heavens, Adore Him.

This is an older hymn, the first two verses found pasted inside the jacket of the hymnbook for the London's Foundling Hospital.    This was an orphanage that was famous for their children's chorus led by trained musicians.   It is remembered today through the hymnbook "Psalms, Hymns and Anthems of the Foundling Hospital, of 1796".   (source Cyber Hymnal)   There is a museum dedicated the the London Foundling Hospital.

The first two verses were penned by an anonymous author, the third verse was penned by Edward Osler.

The author of the first verse paraphrased Psalm 148, showing all creation praising the Lord.  Then it shows how the Lord created all, and all the world obeys his voice.   Verse two shows God's care for his creation, how his promises never fail.   Osler's third verse is our praise to God.

Edward Osler was a physician and author.  He worked as physician from 1819 to 1836.   After which he devoted himself to literary pursuits. Over time he ended up as the editor of the Royal Cornwall Gazette.   He wrote several literary works as well as hymns. (source hymnary)




Lyrics: 

Praise the Lord: ye heavens, adore Him;
Praise Him, angels in the height.
Sun and moon, rejoice before Him;
Praise Him, all ye stars of light.
Praise the Lord, for He hath spoken;
Worlds His mighty voice obeyed.
Laws which never shall be broken
For their guidance He hath made.

Praise the Lord, for He is glorious;
Never shall His promise fail.
God hath made His saints victorious;
Sin and death shall not prevail.
Praise the God of our salvation;
Hosts on high, His power proclaim.
Heaven and earth and all creation,
Laud and magnify His name.

Worship, honor, glory, blessing,
Lord, we offer unto Thee.
Young and old, Thy praise expressing,
In glad homage bend the knee.
All the saints in Heaven adore Thee;
We would bow before Thy throne.
As Thine angels serve before Thee,
So on earth Thy will be done.
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I thought this tune quite different, I liked how she sang it, but not sure if it would work as congregational singing.   She didn't sing the entire hymn.



A finally a more traditional approach


 
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