Alphabet Blogging: F is for Frogs

My son has a love affair with frogs and toads for as far back as I can remember.  He is particularly fond of toads, but is totally loving it that our small pond out back is host to 4 different frogs.   Ergo when I was contemplating what to do for the letter f...I automatically thought about frogs.

I thought about talking about the common frogs we have in the backyard... and was fully intending to research the life out of them...until I ran into this one small fact... 

Frogs, frogs, frogs, Canada has frogs.   LOTS AND LOTS OF FROGS.

Including this funny fact.  We are host to two small populations of TAILED frogs.   Can you believe it?  A frog that has a tail.. and CANADA has TWO populations of slightly different types of them.

I was stoked!!   I just LOVE learning new things... don't you?

Anyways, on to this amazing little critter.  

The Tailed Frog is a remarkable little frog, unique to B.C. in Canada. It is a small frog, 2.5 to 3 centimetres from nose to rump.....Tailed Frogs have vertical pupils, no external tympanum (the round "ear" visible on other frogs), and are voiceless. (source)

Originally this little frog was simple called the tailed frog, but in the year 2000, it was split into two species. The first, the coastal species is called the Pacific Tailed Frog(Ascaphus truei).  The second is called the Rocky Mountain Tailed Frog (Ascaphus montanus). 


Both of these frogs live in very small areas of British Columbia, as well as in select area of the United States.  They live in fast flowing streams.  Their population densities are low and believed to be declining since so few of the rivers in the areas they reside are suitable for reproduction.

These two frogs are very close in colouration and needs, they can't handle temperatures above 20 Celsius. Cold fast flowing, small streaming with an abundance of small micro-climates are just what these frogs need. 

They are a long lived frog, juveniles staying close to home but 4-7 year old frogs dispersing widely from their point of birth.  A long incubation period for the eggs, combined with reproducing every other year, and the loss of old growth forests is contributing to their decline. 

Both sub-species are protected under the British Columbia Wildlife act, making it illegal to own, trap or kill any member of the species. 


Where did I find my information?
Frogwatch
Canadian BioDiversity.
Image
Sararegistry for Rocky tailed.
Sararegistry for coastal.
Wikipedia
British Columbia Frogwatch.

Now just so you know.. Canada has a WHOLE whack of other frogs.  From Spadefoots, spring peepers, tree frogs, bullfrogs, leopard and green frogs, pickerel frogs, cricket and chorus frogs, and so many more.  Check them out eh?  It's a fascinating wet world to explore.  :)

You can find out more here


A Net In Time
Schooling
_________
So Now that you know MY "F" word for the week, what is yours?  Want to join us?

Rules for linking up:
1.       Your post must be family friendly

2.       Your post must relate to the letter of the week, specifically focusing on the letter.

3.       Your post must be published during the week of the link up.  Unless you receive permission from us.

4.       Your post must include a link back to either me or Amanda at Hopkins Homeschool. Heck, we even have fun little buttons you can grab as you can see above.

5.       Please, please, please share the love! Visit a few of the other posts, share or comment on them. Do unto others as you would have them do unto you!

6.     Use the hashtag #abcblogging when you share the love!
If you do not follow these rules, we have the right to remove your link from the link up. We want this to be fun for everyone!

18 comments

  1. I'd like to see a frog with a tail! Funny what you learn.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I kn9w, it would be cool wouldn't it.

      Delete
  2. We're frog fans too! :)

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. yeah! Good to be fans for hoppity frogs. :)

      Delete
  3. This is neat. Thanks for sharing.

    ReplyDelete
  4. What a unique frog. How fun! My son used to remind us whenever we were driving through the semi-arid desert areas of our state, that should we smell peanuts, the Great Basin spadefoot toad was near. LOL

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. that just made the lad and I laugh, the idea of a toad that smells good enough to eat.

      Delete
  5. I'm not a frog fan but, I have a few friends who love them and have them as pets and it's the adults pets not the kids. Interesting post thanks.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. i can see keeping them as pets. totally. :) as long as you were able to maintain a proper environment for them that would work well.

      Delete
  6. that's pretty cool - I'd never heard of the Tailed Frog before. We are most familiar with spring peepers because we have LOTS and LOTS of them here!! They'll start up their spring peeping quite soon, I think, and it is LOUD. LOL

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. yes, spring peppers are loud... especially for being such a small critter eh?

      Delete
  7. Ewww...Frogs! My kids love them! Catch them all summer and I let them escape from their "jails" and blame it on the dog! However, a frog with a tail! That I would love to see...just not touch!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Frogs are so not "eww" ... they are fascinating and a very important part of our ecosystem. :) I would so love to see an actual tailed frog.

      Delete
  8. We have a pond full of frogs and in the summer, you can hardly hear yourself think. I have to close the windows to talk on the phone! :)

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. really? that would be SO COOL!!! I love hearing the frogs in the spring. :)

      Delete
  9. You can tell your son I love frogs as well. When I was in grad school, I worked in the lab of a professor who studied the initial 'flash' or wave of calcium that spreads over a fertilized egg at the instant that it is fertilized. He used the Xenopus african frog (that is Greek for strange foot). Boy are those eggs cool looking: one half is light green and the other half is brown. It was fascinating research and now looking back on it I think it is very possible that that moment when the wave passes over the egg and changes the membrane to protect it from further fertilization is, in people, the moment that God adds our soul. When you visualize it with a non-light microscope, it looks like a wave of electricity, or an aura passing over the fertilized egg. Great post!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I let him read your response and he found it as interesting as I did. I have to admit, I've never thought about when God adds our soul ... never occurred to me... but that electrical wave over the eggs at fertilization... FASCINATING! :)

      Delete

Hi! thanks for stopping by. I love comments, it's good to talk with each other eh?