Igloos and Inukshuks Work

Did you know that some folks think that a good number of Canadians live in Igloos?  I know!!!   It's just so weird to me the first time I heard that.  It wasn't said in jest...the person was VERY serious.   Trust this... I don't live in an igloo and in fact I've never even been in one... at least a proper one.  :)  I've been in snow forts and tepees and half domes but never an igloo. I would love to be in one though, I think it would be VERY cool to see if they truly get so warm inside that a young child could bundle about naked. 

Made me wonder about the science behind the idea.

1. Igloos are made tight, in a spiral, out of compressed snow.  Starting at the bottom, sinking the blocks in and building up on a spiral.  The blocks decrease in size as they build up toward the dome.  



2. In fact, the compressed snow is so air tight that if you don't make vent holes and leave an opening at the top you can suffocate.

3. The design of a traditional igloo has terraced sides, this leaves a cold dump at the bottom for the cold air to sit while the warmer air rises to keep the people warm.   The more people you add the warmer it gets.   Since warm furs are placed on the terraced areas, it gives younger children a warm and safe place to play.

4. With the door being at a right angle to the igloo walls it keeps the cold wind from blowing in, a fire in the middle and a vent hole at top, keeps the air circulating.

Igloos WORK.




Another thing that works is the Inukshuk.

Did you know they are built to act as landmarks?   They are meant to say "someone was here" or "you are on the right path."   An inukshuk in the form of a human being is called an inunnguaq.

Each inukshuk (inuksuit would be plural) is unique, and they each have their own job. They can be a random stacking of stones, or they can be built to look like a person.  Most of the time, traditionally, they were just a random piling of stones, sometimes with a directional pointer.

Normally they appear singly, but occasionally you can find them in groups.   The purpose of a inukshuk can be  as directional aids in navigating or to mark a memorial, or even to indicate migration routes for animals or places where fish can be found.

When they are grouped it can be in a series to make a path, or in a group to mark a significant place.

They have been a valuable asset to the Inuk travellers throughout their history.




Others in the series: 
 A: Sidney Altman, Canadian Scientist B: Beavers! C: Chant National/O Canada. D: Dog Sledding. E: Edgewalk. F. Tailed Frogs.
G: Greats of Canada.
H: Henry Hudson.
I: Igloos and Inukshuks Work 

Come join us won't you?
A Net In Time Schooling

18 comments

  1. Very interesting. Thanks for the videos.

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  2. This was a very interesting and informative post! Bonus points to you for including a video with otters... got my youngest child's attention too!

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  3. I know igloos work - now I know more about HOW! (And yes, people have assumed that we lived in igloos when we lived in Canada too. I couldn't get over that. We didn't, and I never had a sled dog either, although I wanted one.)

    I'm fascinated by inukshuks too, and I thought you might like this Scripture and a Snapshot I shared a few years ago about them: http://bit.ly/2n7DxVp

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    1. That was a neat connection Kym.

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  4. That was very interesting. It has always amazed me how igloos made of ice keep you warm.
    Love the video.

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    1. Igloo aren't made of ice Monique, they are made of compressed snow. Ice is too heavy to lift. Glad you liked the video.

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  5. I can't believe people still think people in Canada live in igloos. When I was little, I used to have a special container to fill with snow and make "bricks" so I could create my own igloo. It was fun!

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    1. i know it's nuts eh? :) Building snow forts is a fun part of childhood... and...ahem... adulthood too. :)

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  6. We learned all bout Inukshuks when we were studying the Arctic but now I am wishing we had spent just a bit more time learning about igloos! How neat.

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    1. igloos are rather neat. If we'd had enough snow this year I would have attempted to make one. :) But this has been the winter of hardly any snow

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  7. Enjoyed learning the science behind the igloos. Now, I know WHY they work. I hadn't ever heard of an Inukshuk before. I love learning! Thanks, Annette!

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    1. I found it interesting as well

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  8. I found it fascinating (especially the igloo construction) and trundled off to share with my boy scout son. He gave me one of those, "oh mom you are cute but so behind the times" looks. At least I learned something. Fun post!

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    1. Oh boys. Mine is often the same

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  9. Darn! I was too slow and didn't get my "I" post linked in time. I'm linking it here. :)

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    1. I didn't get the link Mia. If you message Amanda she could add it for you.

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Hi! thanks for stopping by. I love comments, it's good to talk with each other eh?